Aronofsky’s Noah as Gnostic Duping of the Gullible

Dr. Brian Mattson does an excellent deconstruction of the Gnostic and Kabbalistic ideologies underpinning Aronofsky’s Noah, and then offers a spot on rationale for Aronofsky’s making the film.

Mattson’s conclusion:

I believe Aronofsky did it as an experiment to make fools of us: “You are so ignorant that I can put Noah (granted, it’s Russell Crowe!) up on the big screen and portray him literally as the ‘seed of the Serpent’ and you all will watch my studio’s screening and endorse it.”

He’s having quite the laugh. And shame on everyone who bought it.

And what a Gnostic experiment! In Gnosticism, only the “elite” are “in the know” and have the secret knowledge. Everybody else are dupes and ignorant fools. The “event” of this movie is intended to illustrate the Gnostic premise. We are dupes and fools. Would Christendom awake, please?

In response, I have one simple suggestion:

Henceforth, not a single seminary degree is granted unless the student demonstrates that he has read, digested, and understood Irenaeus of Lyon’s Against Heresies.

Because it’s the 2nd century all over again.

Mattson is right. Irenaeus’s Against Heresies is a vital tool in the culture wars. Yet, some of the men who go to seminary go through the motions in classes because that is what they must do to get to the pulpit. They want to preach the ideas they had before they went to seminary–it is amazing how many are untouched by what they learn there. That mindset makes it easy for them to be duped. For, what they miss is that preaching in the Church stands within a a history and tradition that cannot and should not be disregarded.

Preaching must offer Law and Gospel for the Now and the Not Yet; in this way, the Word is strongly connected to our present times and the problems and conflicts we face. Part of the problem is the ongoing assault on the Church, and those in the pews must be armed with the knowledge to confront it. This means that pastors and teachers of the Church must remain cognizant of the ancient heresies/battles the Church has fought; for, as Mattson said, “it’s the 2nd century all over again.”

The men who are anxious to run to the pulpit to preach the pablum which they may have brought to seminary, and never let go of during their preparation for the ministry, can be checked if seminaries follow Mattson’s good advice:

Henceforth, not a single seminary degree is granted unless the student demonstrates that he has read, digested, and understood Irenaeus of Lyon’s Against Heresies.